Community-centered events organized by HackCLE that focus on confronting and addressing systemic injustices and inequities both as a moral and economic imperative for our city and beyond.

Community-centered events organized by HackCLE that focus on confronting and addressing systemic injustices and inequities both as a moral and economic imperative for our city and beyond.

#FIX216: CRIMINAL JUSTICE TRANSFORMATION IS OCTOBER 26-27, 2018

Friday, October 26 | 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm (Doors Open @ 5pm) and Saturday, October 27 | 10:00 am - 3 pm

Midtown TechHive (6815 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44103)

Join us as we gather at the MidTown TechHive, forming a multidisciplinary coalition with other concerned community members that will design innovative tech-oriented solutions addressing our broken criminal justice system.

This iteration of #Fix216 will challenge cross-functional teams to identify criminal (in)justice problems, break these problems down into manageable parts and develop a plan to address them. While the solutions we come up with may or may not be entirely tech-oriented, our primary objective is to better understand the potential of technology to help solve civic problems.

Scope-a-thon teams will be led by community-based organizations and activists, with developers, designers, and data scientists supporting their needs. This event will center and amplify the voices of returning citizens, whose lived experiences will inform the process of designing, testing and implementing emergent solutions. Before anyone writes a line of code, it’s crucial to understand what a technology solution needs to accomplish. This understanding bridges developers and organization representatives, and the scope-a-thon strengthens this cross-discipline awareness.

In preparation for the Scope-a-thon, HackCLE organizers convened + facilitated a series of meetings with Cleveland residents and key stakeholders who have unique insight into the infinite complexities of criminal justice reform. During this series of twelve dialogues—including 1on1 interviews + focus groups—we uncovered a range of perspectives on the outcomes that matter most to Cleveland residents and have identified a number of key themes worthy of further examination.

After synthesizing these findings, HackCLE has identified the following focus areas, which will inform the creation of Problem Statements, User Personas, and ultimately the potential Solutions we scope during the event:

  1. Bail Reform

  2. Skills Gap

  3. Collateral Consequences/Sanctions

The Why

Our community is in the midst of a moral and economic crisis, which we can no longer accept. Neighborhoods across Northeast Ohio continue to bear the brunt of a criminal justice system that disproportionately ensnares black, brown, and low-income residents. While the full impact of this vicious cycle is felt most acutely by the individuals and their families, the magnitude of the problem and its compounding symptoms threatens the future vitality of our region.

Transforming the criminal justice system is a seemingly insurmountable task of infinite complexity. Yet we believe that within our community of change agents we can find viable solutions that will change someone’s life for the better. Now is the time for action!

The What (or What is a Scope-a-thon?)

We are once again turning to the unique expertise and radical imagination of our network to help us create a disruptive solution to a deeply entrenched problem. The FIX216: Criminal Justice Reform Scope-a-thonwill challenge cross-functional teams to identify criminal (in)justice problems, break these problems down into manageable parts and develop a plan to address them. Over $10,000 in prizes are available for the top team(s) to help them follow through and develop their ideas into sustainable, publicly available applications.

While the solutions we come up with may or may not be entirely tech-oriented, our primary focus is on understanding the purpose and use of technology in helping solve problems. Scope-a-thon teams will be led by community-based organizations and activists, with developers, designers, and data scientists supporting their needs. We will center and amplify the voices of returning citizens, whose lived experiences will inform the process of designing, testing and implementing emergent solutions. Before anyone writes a line of code, it’s crucial to understand what a technology solution needs to accomplish. This understanding bridges developers and organization representatives, and the scope-a-thon strengthens this cross-discipline awareness.

fix2162_image.jpg

What to Know Before You Show!

Prepare for #Fix216.

 

#Fix216 “1.0” was Cleveland's first Social Justice themed civic hackathon.

It was held May 29th and 30th, 2015.

In 2015 Hack Cleveland held the Fix216 civic hackathon.

[Archive]

#Fix216 will produce websites, apps, and/or tools that can facilitate open dialogue, idea generation, and awareness-building around public safety, excessive force and the Department of Justice consent decree in Cleveland.

This event will:

1) present technology as a way to lift up the work of area residents and organizers and 2) make the case for activism to those who are unfamiliar.

Fix 216 will also include introductory lessons for people wanting to learn the basics of coding, civic tech, and the process of pitching ideas to investors. This landmark two-day event is open to everyone, community advocates, techies and everyone in between.

WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES THE FIX 216 HACKATHON WILL TACKLE?

There are four main issues that Fix 216 will address in this hackathon:

  1. Communities do not know what the consent decree means for them, their neighbors, and their city.

  2. People do not know what their role is in addressing the consent decree for their city - or how to do that.

  3. Good, working, easy to access mechanisms do not exist for people to be active in using the consent decree to make a more cohesive Cleveland.

  4. Cleveland hasn't built an easily accessible two-way road, connecting citizens to decision-makers, which is needed to welcome everyone who desires it, a stake within the solution building process

When and where will the Fix 216 hackathon be held?

May 29 & 30, 2015 | Friday 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm | Saturday  11am - 6:30pm at St. Luke's Auditorium | Inside The Intergenerational School 11327 Shaker Blvd #200 W, Cleveland, OH 44104

Is the Fix 216 hackathon free?

Yes, Fix 216 is free to attend.

I DON'T know anything about tech or coding, am I welcome to attend?

Your city, your space! No matter who you are and what skills you bring — it only matters that you care about these issues and want to learn more or help others learn more. Everyone can contribute to making tech solutions — people who know their neighborhood, people who are creative, people who understand systems at work in Cleveland, people who understand systems inside a computer.

I'm CONCERNED ABOUT MY SAFETY, I'VE HAD PROBLEMATIC EXPERIENCES IN TECH SPACES. IS THIS A SAFE SPACE?

Hack Cleveland is dedicated to providing a safe, respectful and affirming space that is a harassment-free experience for everyone regardless of gender, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, disability, skillset, physical appearance, body size, race, age, or religion. Read our Code of Conduct.

Is this event family friendly, can my kids come?

Fix 216 is a family affair! Families are welcomed and encouraged to attend.

What will the days look like - is there an agenda?

You can see the event agenda, here.

I DON'T live in Cleveland, how can I help?

Fix 216 is open to everyone, this includes remote attendees. Request to join our Slack channel to learn more, hackCLE.slack.com.You can help by spreading the word to your friends and family, and using the hashtags #HackCLE and #Fix216 in social media. Additionally, you can contribute to the open source project(s) after the event by coding, developing content, testing and debugging, or by donating funds to support project sustainability costs. Contact the team to learn more.

WHat Happened at the FIX 216 Civic Hackathon May 29 & 30, 2015?

A diverse group of 70+ attendees came together to create 5 projects addressing various challenges facing Cleveland. The problems addressed were:

  • Impact of more policing on community safety

  • Cost of implementing the consent decree

  • Consent decree request for increase police accountability, reporting and training without any tools to do so (especially ones that will allow community participation)